benrogerswpg:

Cloth Dyer, Tamil Nadu, India, People of the World http://bit.ly/1pzhvpx

benrogerswpg:

Cloth Dyer, Tamil Nadu, India, People of the World http://bit.ly/1pzhvpx

(via beautifuldancewhore)

escapekit:

#IPHONEONLY

London photographer Julian Calverley has captured beautiful landscape all from an iPhone.

Stunning to see what beauty you can capture on something as small as your phone.  

(Source: behance.net)

sciencesoup:

World’s First Photograph
Steady advancements in chemistry, light and optics culminated in 1826 with the creation of the first photograph. Frenchman Joseph Nicéphore Niépce pondered the possibility of using light-sensitive compounds to reproduce imagery as early as 1793, but it wasn’t until a summer’s day in 1827 that Niépce managed to permanently fix the first photograph. He coated a pewter plate with bitumen of Judaea and placed this sheet inside a camera obscura, then focused it on the scene outside his window—the courtyard and outbuildings of his family’s country home. The place was exposed to sunlight for eight hours, during which the bitumen subject to brightness became hardened and bleached. Niépce later washed the plate in lavender oil and white petroleum, dissolving the bitumen that wasn’t exposed and leaving only the hardened parts behind. The result was a lasting impression of the garden: a direct positive, because the dark parts are the metal plate and the light parts are the bleached bitumen. Basically, every image we have today—on TV and video games and the internet—all evolved from bitumen and lavender oil on a metal plate.
Read about more Milestones in Photography on National Geographic

sciencesoup:

World’s First Photograph

Steady advancements in chemistry, light and optics culminated in 1826 with the creation of the first photograph. Frenchman Joseph Nicéphore Niépce pondered the possibility of using light-sensitive compounds to reproduce imagery as early as 1793, but it wasn’t until a summer’s day in 1827 that Niépce managed to permanently fix the first photograph. He coated a pewter plate with bitumen of Judaea and placed this sheet inside a camera obscura, then focused it on the scene outside his window—the courtyard and outbuildings of his family’s country home. The place was exposed to sunlight for eight hours, during which the bitumen subject to brightness became hardened and bleached. Niépce later washed the plate in lavender oil and white petroleum, dissolving the bitumen that wasn’t exposed and leaving only the hardened parts behind. The result was a lasting impression of the garden: a direct positive, because the dark parts are the metal plate and the light parts are the bleached bitumen. Basically, every image we have today—on TV and video games and the internet—all evolved from bitumen and lavender oil on a metal plate.

Read about more Milestones in Photography on National Geographic

(via beautifuldancewhore)

nythroughthelens:

Paris - Streets

—-

It’s these city streets,

the ones that press on

the backs of eyelids

at night,

persisting and passing

through the cobwebs

of memories

that are spun

like fairy floss

across dreamscapes

where every

passing stranger

tells tales

that skip beats

of a heart

hung on

every bit of

concrete, steel,

and paint.

—-

How people interact with their environment has always intrigued me. I have a tendency to view life as an elaborate film. Every cityscape, street, and landscape forms a backdrop in a scene that unfolds before my eyes. When I was a child, I used to tell people that every time I blinked another scene started. And in a lot of ways, this has carried over into my photography and writing. I craft elaborate narratives in split seconds of the people who are populating any given scene and moment.

Paris is probably one of the most intriguing cities when it comes to observing people against the city’s backdrop. The city itself is a complex set of characters. The days I spent there were mostly cloudy and ominous which was fascinating. I think there is a tendency to romanticize Paris as a city of sun in terms of kitschy Paris photos that seem to populate Pinterest full of lush blossoms and never-ending sunny days. But the reality (at least while I was there) was far more nuanced.

These are just a few photos I took while I walked around Paris of street scenes. Normally I take photos alone. Photography is a very solitary process for me and I tend to be “in my own head” most of the time. However, I was often with either Gael or Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris or (later in the week) also Katherine from Atout France. And, what was strange was that I really enjoyed it. It helped that everyone was a veritable fountain of interesting knowledge and that they all had a super passionate love for Paris. Typically when I shoot when other people are around it negatively influences my photography but it really wasn’t the case while I was in Paris which was awesome. In fact, it was nice to talk quite a bit about all sorts of things while shooting and the icing on the cake was that I learned so much.

—-

Interested in viewing all of my Paris posts so far? Here they are:

Paris Through the Lens

Looking for these (and more) Paris photos to view larger? Here you go (click or tap on each photo to view larger):

Paris

—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I would not have been in Paris having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris.

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ilya Kisaradov Aka Ezorenier Takes Gorgeous Surreal Photography

Ezorenier.deviantart 

Russian photographer Ilya Kisaradov’s subjects are primarily women, who are out in the open with nature. In her photographs, the image of the birdcage appears a few times, possibly symbolizing imprisonment. The confinement of her subjects juxtaposed against the backdrop of the openness of nature illustrates the dichotomy between humans and nature and how we continuously imprison ourselves by getting further and further away from nature. Though regardless of what message one may take away from Ilya Kisaradov photographs, their stunning quality and surreal imagery are electrifying and compels the viewer to gaze intently. She is both expressive and contemplative.

(via toxicnotebook)

greatgdean:

Maud Fealy

greatgdean:

Maud Fealy

BRASSAÏ - Les escaliers de Montmartre (1930)

BRASSAÏ - Les escaliers de Montmartre (1930)

natgeofound:

A young Kenyan woman holds her pet deer in Mombassa, March 1909.Photograph by Underwood and Underwood

natgeofound:

A young Kenyan woman holds her pet deer in Mombassa, March 1909.Photograph by Underwood and Underwood

(via greatgdean)

Tags: photography

picturesintheattic:

Sgt. 1st Class Owen Marsh of North Hollywood leans out a bus window to pick up his wife, Evelyn, for a kiss before going to Ft. MacArthur, where he was discharged, 1952

picturesintheattic:

Sgt. 1st Class Owen Marsh of North Hollywood leans out a bus window to pick up his wife, Evelyn, for a kiss before going to Ft. MacArthur, where he was discharged, 1952

(via moonlight-driive)

imgfave:

Posted by Starlights husband

uncontrollablebiter:

webofepic:

People who aren’t afraid of heights.  The last photo almost looks like some kind of sci-fi city  to me (I think it’s actually Moscow though)!

More like “people who aren’t afraid to die”

(Source: xaxor.com, via bewarethelunarlight)

5centsapound:

Caleb Cole: Odd One Out:

The images in Odd One Out began as found photographs, purchased in antique stores and estate sales, of groups of people during special events, reunions, and family gatherings. The photographs are the spoils of a hunt, the proceeds of afternoons spent looking into the eyes of people I do not know and who may no longer be living. I select images of people who, unlike the rest of the smiling faces in the frame, bear looks of loneliness and longing that stop me in my tracks.

(via harpias)